lastests post

Sayeda Aisha Mosque in Egypt: Google Maps removes an “offensive term” added to its name after an angry online campaign

picture released, Getty Images

comment on the photo,

The mosque of Sayyida Aisha bint Jaafar Al-Sadiq bin Muhammad Al-Baqir bin Ali Zain Al-Abidin bin Al-Hussein bin Ali bin Abi Talib in Cairo

Users of social networking sites in Egypt launched an electronic campaign to remove the “offensive term” on Wednesday afternoon next to the name “Sayeda Aisha Mosque” in Cairo in the results of the Google search engine.

This comes days after a similar offense was added to the name of the shrine of Imam Ali bin Abi Talib in Najaf.

What happened?

Users of the Google search engine site and its maps in Arabic in Egypt, who are searching for the location of the Sayeda Aisha Mosque in Cairo, were surprised that the name of the mosque had been added to it with an offensive word, without being able to know the reason.

The distortion of the name sparked outrage among the tweeters and bloggers, who launched calls to correct the name of the mosque on Google Maps without waiting for a response from the company.

Users also posted the steps to correct the name via the Google Maps application.

Indeed, the name was corrected within hours of the campaign’s start, which appeared in the tweets’ discussions.

What is the correct ratio of the mosque to the wife of the Prophet Muhammad?

The campaign revealed the ignorance of many that the name of the mosque is not attributed to Aisha bint Abi Bakr Al-Siddiq, the wife of the Prophet Muhammad, and that Lady Aisha was buried in Al-Baqi’ in Madinah.

And it is correct that the name of this mosque is attributed to Aisha Bint Jaafar Al-Sadiq Bin Muhammad Al-Baqir Bin Ali Zain Al-Abidin Bin Al-Hussein Bin Ali Bin Abi Talib, which is what a group of tweeters indicated.

Similar abuse to the shrine of Imam Ali in Najaf

A group of users indicated that adding the offensive word to the name of the Sayeda Aisha Mosque in Cairo comes days after a similar abuse had been added to the name of the shrine of Imam Ali bin Abi Talib.

This sparked a great controversy when users of the “Google Maps” application were surprised by the appearance of these offensive phrases while searching for “the shrine of Imam Ali” in the Iraqi city of Najaf.

As a result, the pioneers of social networking sites in Iraq launched an electronic campaign to force the Google search engine to remove these offensive terms.

The users of the application at that time expressed their anger and resentment at the abuse of the shrine, which is one of the holy places for Shiite Muslims in Iraq, and they also called on the official authorities to intervene to solve this issue.

They also shared the steps to request that amendment directly via Google Maps, which eventually resulted in the company removing the offensive terms and condemning it.

“Sectarian” accusations

On the other hand, a group of tweeters blamed the distortion of the name of the Sayyida Aisha Mosque in Cairo on the “Shiite sect”, believing that it was a response to the previous abuse of the shrine of Imam Ali, and they demanded that they “correct the error.”

However, another group believed that the distortion of the name of the Sayeda Aisha Mosque in Cairo, and before that the shrine of Imam Ali bin Abi Talib in Najaf, through Google Maps, is the arrangement of a third party aimed at provoking sectarian strife between Sunni and Shiite Muslims.

There was no official comment from Google confirming the identity of the party responsible for these offensive add-ons.

Sayeda Aisha Mosque

  • Historians are unanimously agreed that Lady Aisha Bint Jaafar Al-Sadiq Bin Muhammad Al-Baqir Bin Ali Zain Al-Abidin Bin Al-Hussein Bin Ali Bin Abi Talib came to Egypt and died there.
  • Historians confirm that Lady Aisha is buried in Egypt, and wrote on her grave: “This is the tomb of the honorable Lady Aisha, one of the children of Jafar Al-Sadiq, son of Imam Muhammad Baqir, son of Imam Ali Zain Al-Abidin, son of Imam Hussein, son of Imam Ali bin Abi Talib, may God honor him.”
  • The mosque was built near the tomb of Lady Aisha in Cairo, and until the sixth century AH remained a simple shrine.
  • In the Ayyubid period, a school was built next to the shrine by order of Salah al-Din al-Ayyubi “to protect it from the attacks of the Crusaders.”
  • In the eighteenth century, the mosque was rebuilt in the form of a square with a courtyard in the middle and surrounded by porticos.
  • The mosque is currently located in the Khalifa neighborhood outside the Citadel Square on Sayeda Aisha Street in Cairo.

Related Articles

Back to top button